handover of the models in munich

handover of the models in munich

handover of the models in munich
Rehart GmbHRehart Power

REHARTPOWER in Deutsches Museum

As part of the general refurbishment of Deutsches Museum in Munich the exhibition “Energietechnik/Kraftmaschinen” [Energy technology/Prime movers”] will also be modernised. The curator in charge asked us, as manufacturers of hydropower plants REHART GmbH, if we could provide two exhibits for this. After a short internal discussion we quickly decided that this would be an ideal project for our trainees.

Under the supervision of Frank Schiwietz, Hydropower Division Manager at REHART, this exciting and unusual task was assigned to four trainees who dealt with the entire project on their own accord – from planning, design and purchasing to production. The result is: two models, one on a scale of 1:12 comprising a hydropower screw and fish migration screw (FAS) and another one of a single hydropower screw on a scale of 1:10. Contrary to the original, the FAS in the model has a transparent tube so that the inner screw is visible. The main challenge was the small dimensions and the low material thicknesses, since REHART usually thinks and works in larger dimensions. Despite the obstacles they had to face, all involved did an excellent job and we got two wonderful exhibits which will give the museum visitors a very good impression of the a “small hydro power station” and the structure and operation of our plants.
As technical product designers, Lena Offinger and Jacqueline Ortner, were responsible for the planning, construction and the communication with Deutsches Museum. Johannes Fackler, metal constructor took care of the cutting and welding and Patrick Unfried, as a cutting machine operator, supplied the required turned parts.

The official handover of the models to Deutsches Museum took place on 30 July 2020 by Lena Offinger and Jacqueline Ortner in Munich. However, before the visitors can see the new exhibition space with the models by REHARTPOWER, there will be a lot of water under the bridge - or flowing through our hydropower plants. As things are today, the area will perhaps be accessible as of winter 2021/22, the renovation of the museum may even last until 2028.